Apple Introduces ResearchKit, Provides the Tools Needed to Revolutionize Medical Studies [Video]

Apple Introduces ResearchKit, Provides the Tools Needed to Revolutionize Medical Studies [Video]

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Apple today announced ResearchKit, an open source software framework that provides medical and health researchers then tools needed to revolutionize medical studies. ResearchKit enables doctors and scientists to gather more data frequently and more accurately from participants using iPhone apps. Researchers have already developed apps to help gather data for asthma, breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. With ResearchKit, the users decide if they want to participate in a study and how their data is shared.

“iOS apps already help millions of customers track and improve their health. With hundreds of millions of iPhones in use around the world, we saw an opportunity for Apple to have an even greater impact by empowering people to participate in and contribute to medical research,” said Jeff Williams, Apple’s senior vice president of Operations. “ResearchKit gives the scientific community access to a diverse, global population and more ways to collect data than ever before.”

Apple Introduces ResearchKit, Provides the Tools Needed to Revolutionize Medical Studies [Video]

ResearchKit turns iPhone into a powerful tool for medical research. When granted permission by the user, apps can access data from the Health app such as weight, blood pressure, glucose levels and asthma inhaler use, which are measured by third-party devices and apps. HealthKit is a software framework Apple introduced with iOS 8 to provide developers the ability for health and fitness apps to communicate with each other. ResearchKit can also request from a user, access to the accelerometer, microphone, gyroscope and GPS sensors in iPhone to gain insight into a patient’s gait, motor impairment, fitness, speech and memory.

ResearchKit also makes it easier to recruit participants for large-scale studies, accessing a broad cross-section of the population—not just those within driving distance of an institution. Study participants can complete tasks or submit surveys right from the app, so researchers spend less time on paperwork and more time analyzing data. ResearchKit also enables researchers to present an interactive informed consent process. Users choose which studies to participate in and the data they want to provide in each study.

“We’re excited to use these new ResearchKit tools from Apple to expand participant recruitment and quickly gather even more data through the simple use of an iPhone app. The data it will provide takes us one step closer to developing more personalized care,” said Patricia Ganz, MD, professor at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and Director of Cancer Prevention & Control Research at UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. “Access to more diverse patient-reported health data will help us learn more about long-term aftereffects of cancer treatments and provide us with a better understanding of the breast cancer patient experience.”

“When it comes to researching how we can better diagnose and prevent disease, numbers are everything. By using Apple’s new ResearchKit framework, we’re able to extend participation beyond our local community and capture significantly more data to help us understand how asthma works,” said Eric Schadt, PhD, the Jean C. and James W. Crystal Professor of Genomics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Founding Director of the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology. “Using iPhone’s advanced sensors, we’re able to better model an asthma patient’s condition to enable us to deliver a more personalized, more precise treatment.”

Research kit will be released as an open source framework next month. You can learn more about research kit here. To download ResearchKit apps, check out the App Store page here.


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NoGoodNick - March 9, 2015 at 8:03pm
No way would I agree to participate in this. While I'd LOVE to get medical data from my watch, cloud data is too easy to break into. Every insurance company and every 3rd rate company would have access to all my most private medical information. "Hello, sir, I'm cold calling you to discuss aromatherapy for your lung cancer."
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