Apple Reports Improved Supplier Compliance With 60-Hour Work Week

Posted March 21, 2012 at 8:01pm by iClarified | Please help us and submit a translation by clicking here | 4734 views

Apple is reporting that its suppliers have reduced the amount of overtime worked by their employees.

In our effort to end the industry practice of excessive overtime, we're working closely with our suppliers to manage employee working hours. Weekly data collected in January 2012 on more than 500,000 workers employed by our suppliers showed 84 percent compliance with the 60-hour work week specified in our code. In February 2012, compliance with the 60-hour work week among 500,000 workers at those suppliers increased to 89 percent, with workers averaging 48 hours per week. That's a substantial improvement over previous results, but we can do better. We will continue to share our progress by reporting this data on a monthly basis.

Read More [via DaringFireball]


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Russell - March 22, 2012 at 3:40am
"Apple prohibits practices that threaten the rights of workers.." http://www.apple.com/supplierresponsibility/code-of-conduct/labor-and-human-rights.html I would like to see that enforced in Cupertino.
budsal - March 21, 2012 at 8:38pm
60 hours times 35 cents per hour = $21 per week. I'm sure the hourly wage is off but these people are slaves . I know I am part of the problem, I'm will definately buy the next iPhone and iPad. These people need better wages also. They need unions. They just need help of so many kinds. They are so fucked. What a fucking world.......
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